Monday, August 6, 2012

The Sex Symbol, Marilyn Monroe, HARLOW, Who Killed Teddy Bear? Making of A Male Model ~ 6 DVDs $14.99 Free Ship USA









A few of these films were intended for "theatrical release." They were highlights of their day, their era. They were box-office smashes.

The balance ... of these films were the highest rated during their time slot. They caught the attention of the public.

The stars in them were the hottest in their day. Some were re-inventing themselves in hopes it would pivot them into their former heydays, while others were hoping this would parlay them into movies and feature films.

Whatever reason, they are fondly etched into our memories with indelible ink.



Carol Lynley as HARLOW (1965)

NY Times, May 1965
"The "Harlow" based on Mr. Shulman's handiwork still lurks around the bend, trumpets blaring. Meanwhile, at the Paramount, is the race-winner penned by Karl Tunberg and shot, in the short-cut Electronovision process, apparently before the ink dried. The picture took eight days for filming, the last two due to inclement weather. It didn't rain long enough.

There is, front, center and anything but alluring, Carol Lynley as the nation's movie sex goddess of the thirties. She squeaks, occasionally furrows her youthful brow and twitches her nostrils.

Let's round out the cast. There's Ginger Rogers, as the star's whining, pushing mother; Barry Sullivan, as the girl's lazy, avaricious stepfather; Efrem Zimbalist Jr., as a lofty-nosed actor the heroine finally loves. Hurd Hatfield plays Paul Bern, her "incapable" producer-husband, and Jack Kruschen is Louis B. Mayer, depicted here as a kind of realistic, owlish Santa Claus.

All these, and unfortunates, under Alex Segal's direction, lope through the vignettes of this bony, bargain-basement appraisal of a famous, misguided and tragic young woman. The story, at least as souped up here, never suggests the evolution of a fine comedienne—an actress who learned—whose radiant, white-hot image brightened the screen, glowed and dimmed.

The picture has the tough-minded young heroine falling into her choice "Hell's Angels" role and then battling her mother, stepfather and studio over her sex synonymity, seeking solace in a doomed marriage and finally expiring, rather mysteriously, attended by true love (Mr. Zimbalist) as "Mr. Mayer" intones, "May God rest her soul." Most of the dialogue is atrocious. The picture hovers over the sequence of her tragic alliance with the suicidal Mr. Bern—a brief, amoral aftermath—with peephole solicitude.

Hermione Baddeley totters in with motherly advice to the heroine, playing Marie Dressler. Michael Dante, as a professional lover, clips off the film's most telling line to Miss Lynley: "Everybody has problems. But you stars are the ones who can afford to have them."

The Electronovision rush job on Miss Harlow's life and career is also a dimly-lit business technically. Maybe it's just as well. This much is for sure: Whatever the second "Harlow" picture looks and sounds like, it can't be much worse than the first.

B/W - Overall good quality for this low budget opus filmed in 8 days in EARLY videotape style media.

Carroll Baker is HARLOW (1965) Angela Lansbury is Mamma Jean
Million dollar Big screen adaptation of the life of Jean Harlow . (TV release, complete un-cut)

Making of A Male Model (1983) Joan Collins, Jon-Erik Hexum
Jeff Conaway, Kevin McCarthy, Roxie Roker, Arte Johnson

Executive Producers: Aaron Spelling, Douglas S. Cramer, E. Duke Vincent, Dennis Hammer, Lynn Loring

A chic Manhattan modeling agency's seductive owner (legendary Joan Collins) plucks a rugged young Nevada rancher (Jon-Erik Hexum) from obscurity and endeavors to make him into an overnight sex symbol, only to discover that he craves the wide open spaces back home.

Jon-Erik Hexum, in his first starring film, is the hunk who came to real-life prominence via two best-selling beefcake calendars, followed by the short-lived "Voyagers" series. Among the cast members are second generation actors including Michael Anderson, Jr., Robert Walker, Jr., Heidi Hagman (Larry's daughter), and Jennifer Edwards (Blake's daughter), as well as Rosemary Stack (wife of Robert Stack) as a fashion world bigwig. TV movie.

The Sex Symbol (1974) Connie Stevens
A thinly disguised version of the life of Marilyn Monroe, detailing her ups and downs in life and how her erratic behavior contributes to her deteriorating career. Shelley Winters tears up the small screen with her emoting and tongue in cheek over-acting.

Combined Portugeuse release with UK release, occasional Portugeuse subtitles. Complete/un-cut with nudity, quality = Good.

Marilyn: The Untold Story (1980) Catherine Hicks
Miss Hicks won an Emmy nomination for her portrayal of Marilyn based upon Norman Mailer's best-selling novel of the day. DVD is the ABC Sunday Night Movie premiere.

Who Killed Teddy Bear? (1965) Sal Mineo, Juliet Prowse
Low budget - cult classic, complete and un-cut.

6 DVDs
In DVD/CD sleeves, photo labels.


PAY here (CLICK link) for $15.99 DVDs (USA only)
6 DVDs in DVD/CD sleeve, photo label. Guaranteed, replaced with same title.
http://rarefilmclassics.myshopify.com/products/pay-here-click-link-below-15-99-6-dvds-usa-only-free-ship

During checkout, type DVD titles in Instructions.
.